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February 8th, 2011 - Media Awareness Day

Posted by Roar of the Bewildered Herd on February 8, 2011 at 12:50 PM

Roar of the Bewildered Herd makes February 8th Media Awareness Day.

 

Today, on the 15th Anniversary of the 1996 Telecommunications Act, it seems appropriate to discuss the current crisis of the new laws set into motion by the FCC pertaining to Network Neutrality.

 

On December 20, 2010, the FCC ruled on regulations for broadband Internet connection. The FCC aims to ensure that broadband providers do not discriminate against Internet content and applications. However, the wireless industry seems to have been left alone. In an age where most people access the Internet via their mobile devices, the decision and ruling will not apply to this form of connectivity. This seems to have allowed the giants of the telecommunications industry such as AT&T, Verizon and Comcast to do what they choose; no regulations means discriminatory Internet access. Use Verizon lines, get Verizon’s applications faster. Use AT&T lines, download AT&T content faster - this is the fear. This creates a two tier system of the Internet. Some are saying that the telecommunications giants got their way; but then why would Verizon and Metro PCS file law suits against the FCC? Both companies seek to repeal the Agency's new Net Neutrality regulations. The question is - is Corporate Propaganda at work here?

 

Alex Carey mentions that Corporate Propaganda is the tool used by Corporate Power to protect itself from Democracy. So if the FCC is a representation of the people, signifying a Democratic process, then it seems to be appropriate from Corporate Power to try and over-turn the ruling, in effect, taking the power away from the people. If the people want a free Internet for all, why are the people not fighting for this? Where is the open discussion? Why are the necessary questions not being asked to achieve this? If this is truly a Democratic society, where the people choose what is necessary and what is not, why can’t a free Internet be possible right now?

 

In another recent move, Fred Upton, the Chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, said today that the House could deny funding to the Federal Communications Commission to carry out controversial network-neutrality rules.

 

What do the Telecommunication giants stand to gain if the FCC rulings are over-turned, and why is the Energy and Commerce Committee threatening to pull FCC funding in an attempt to block the order approved in December? It is hard to deny that when the Democratic system exercises its rights and uses government agencies in the necessary way to get what the people want, Corporate Propaganda rears its head and the agenda is set in motion to sway opinion in favor of Corporate Power. 

Categories: Network Neutrality

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3 Comments

Reply Lisi Lopez
2:13 PM on June 23, 2011 
This made me see things in a whole new light. Before reading this I didn't even know Network Neutrality existed but now I'm glad that I know it does. I will definitely research this further since the Internet is an important part of my life and what ultimately happens to/with it will undoubtedly affect me.
Reply Reinaldo
12:00 AM on June 24, 2011 
I think regardless of the choice made or actions taken, not everyone will be completely satisfied. In such sensitive issues like these it will always be controversial because it affects the "little" people, not just the big companies. This was a good post because I'm sure it opened a lot of people's eyes to what is going on and I'm sure it is something that everyone will relate to.
Reply Roar of the Bewildered Herd
3:18 PM on July 14, 2011 
Reinaldo says...
I think regardless of the choice made or actions taken, not everyone will be completely satisfied. In such sensitive issues like these it will always be controversial because it affects the "little" people, not just the big companies. This was a good post because I'm sure it opened a lot of people's eyes to what is going on and I'm sure it is something that everyone will relate to.

The best analogy that has been used in regards to explaining Network Neutrality is electricity. There will always be a corporation behind the lines that are used to provide electricity in your home. However; that company cannot control the speed in which electricity comes to your house, the strength of the electricity that comes in your house or whether or not your entitled to electricity. Electricity it is an open source commodity. This is how Network Neutrality must be viewed. A corporation must not have say over the rules of the lines, they must provide the lines unconditionally. The discussion for control over the internet is an important issue. If information is power and the people of a Democracy are withheld from information, then the people have no power. This does not resemble a Democracy of the people and for the people. However; it does exemplify that corporate power continues to use corporate propaganda as a means of protection from Democracy.